MY BIG GAY ITALIAN FUNERAL is coming to the Avenel Performing Arts Center next month

The Avenel Performing Arts Center (APAC), a new multidisciplinary performing arts center located in Woodbridge, New Jersey, presents My Big Gay Italian Funeral from October 7 to 17, 2021.

My Big Gay Italian Funeral is the sequel to “My Big Gay Italian Wedding”. Like the wedding, the funeral was also published and authorized by Samuel French and performed in several cities around the world. The funeral was held for more than two years on Off-Broadway at New York’s St. Luke’s Theater in front of a mostly sold-out audience.

Created by three-time Emmy Award winner and APAC’s own Executive and Artistic Director Anthony J. Wilkinson, My Big Gay Italian Funeral picks up where “My Big Gay Italian Wedding” left off, with the funeral of Anthony’s father, Joe. Anthony reunites with his gay brother Peter Pinnunziato, who he hasn’t spoken to for over a decade. Family drama and crazy characters unite on the APAC stage.

The cast of My Big Gay Italian Funeral includes Anthony J. Wilkinson (Antoine), Brandon Goins (Peter), Laurie Kirk (Angela), Alexa Harris (Ondine), Debra Toscano (Aunt ToniAnn), Tricia Gozzi (Lucia), Marissa Paoella (Maria), Geri Rosetti (Aunt Donna), Marta (Vidalia), Anthony Pampalone (Ezio / Lou), Nick Barbati (Howie), Anida Tension (Maurizio / Diamondelle) , Taso Mikroulis (Dominick), and Sonia blangiardo (Director).

Times of my great gay italian funeral show
October 7, 2021 – 8:00 p.m.
October 8, 2021 – 8:00 p.m.
October 9, 2021 – 8:00 p.m.
October 10, 2021 – 3:00 p.m.
October 13, 2021 – 2:00 p.m.
October 14, 2021 – 8:00 p.m.
October 15, 2021 – 8:00 p.m.
October 16, 2021 – 8:00 p.m.
October 17, 2021 – 3:00 p.m.

Tickets: $ 49.50
Box office: (732) 314-0500
The Avenel Performing Art Center is located at 150 Avenel Street in Avenel, New Jersey (located in the Township of Woodbridge). To purchase tickets, visit www.avenelarts.com or contact the box office at (732) 314-0500.

At the Avenel Performing Arts Center, the health and well-being of patrons, artists and staff is our top priority. APAC has taken the necessary precautions in the cleaning and sanitation procedures at our site. As you know, this situation changes daily, and we are doing our part to keep abreast as protocols and procedures are adjusted to ensure the safety and health of our community. We thank you for your understanding.


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BPCC PERFORMING ARTS THEATER WINS THE GREATEST HONORS FROM THE KENNEDY CENTER AMERICAN COLLEGE THEATER FESTIVAL

The Bossier Parish Community College’s drama program production of tense and suspenseful drama, Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde was honored with the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival (KCACTF) awards.

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde were selected by the official KCACTF referees to be considered for the annual Region VI festival. This recognition places Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde among a small limited number of nominees out of which five pieces from the region will be selected to be presented at the Region VI KCACTF Festival in February 2022. Dr Ray Scott Crawford, Dean of Communication and Performing Arts , directed the production and the Cavalier Players produced the show which was presented at the Stephen W. Slaughter Theater in Bossier City.

The cast members received the “Excellence in Ensemble Scene Change” award for their performance in transitioning sets from scene to scene.

Technical Director David White won three meritorious awards for his work in stage design, lighting design and prop art.

The cast members also received individual awards. For excellence in acting, Josue Escobar, John Medlin and Candice Lott received Irene Ryan nominations for their roles as Henry Jekyll, Sir Danvers Carew / Hyde 2 and Poole / Hyde 4. The three students will now be competing with approximately 400 other Region VI students for a chance to win the Irene Ryan National Scholarship and participate in the KCACTF National Festival in Washington DC

Other cast members Cason Smith and Sarah Johnson earned Irene Ryan nominations for their performances in the spring production, The Good Doctor. They too will participate in the KCACTF Region VI festival for the chance to win the Irene Ryan National Scholarship.

BPCC Theater graduate Zachary Tyler also participated in the production. The show’s technical team included Kendall Reynolds as stage manager and Sarah Foster as assistant stage manager.

The KCACTF encourages, recognizes and celebrates the finest and most diverse works produced in university and college theater programs across the country. Region VI includes Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Texas, Missouri, and New Mexico. Five plays will be chosen from this six-state region to perform at the Region VI festival in February 2022.


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Portland Opera Block Performing Arts Center Gears Up For New Season

Portland – The Portland performing arts studio has grown in space and attendance as it prepares for season three.

Portland’s Opera Block Performing Arts Center is gearing up for next season with additional lineup and expanded space. The center is located at 140 1/2 Kent St in downtown Portland. It’s in it.

The open house is scheduled for Monday 23 August, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the center. Staff can answer questions.

The 2021-22 season begins September 20 and lasts until May 20. Course registration is available online. operablockperformancearts.com And with the centre’s mobile app.

The Performing Arts Center offers a variety of classes, including TikTok classes. We are also offering karate starting this fall. There are also traditional performing arts classes such as magic, drama, improvisation, and dance.

Tim Fuller, one of the founders of Opera Block PAC, said it was conceived and designed as a prop for the opera next door. According to Fuller, the opera house will be restored within the next two years.

“Really, our studio is designed and built so that there really is something for everyone,” Fuller said. “We really love everyone. At some point, when the magnificent opera house next door is restored, it will be the performance venue for our performing arts center. ”

Fuller said the center’s goal was to “close the gap” in the performing arts. Opera Block PAC has experienced seasonal growth and currently has 392 active students. Fuller calls this space a “second home” for students and wants the community to embrace a variety of services.

“We think outside the box and try to reimagine what happens in a standard dance studio, because kids are now all so digital, so that sort of thing like before. Because I’m not engaged in this, ”Fuller said.

According to Fuller, the center expanded beyond the existing space last season, doubling the square footage (1,800 square feet) and offering more classes than before. Current facilities will also be modernized, including the addition of cushioned dance floors.

“When two or three classrooms are full, we’re just full,” he said. “We can’t do anything else. Adding more classrooms will allow us to take more lessons at the same time. This season we were able to increase the size and really double it. I’m lucky. ”

The first season of Opera Block was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020. The lockdown allowed organizers to invest in technology to keep students safe during a pandemic. The technology included video doorbells and live streaming lessons.

“Despite the challenges after COVID, it worked pretty well,” Fuller said. “We are constantly striving to improve technology and always aim to be a better place and a better studio for everyone.”

The Opera Block PAC is of interest to a community within a 30 mile radius of Portland, including students from Ionia, Grand Ledge, Sunfield, Fowler and Lake Odessa.

The founders of Fuller and Opera Block PAC want to work in the community and provide the programming they want. According to Fuller, the center is working on adding an adult program.

“Every time we expand and add a new class, it’s very popular and fills up quickly, allowing parents and kids to grow up and add whatever programming they want,” Fuller said. Said.

– Contact journalist Evan Sasiela. [email protected] Follow him on twitter @SalsaEvan..



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How the Emmy-nominated drama collection and docu collection shed light on what historical past books failed to note

The troubled moments of HBO’s postmodern superhero miniseries Watchmen had nothing to be terrifying: a panicked black couple and their youngest son roam the fiery streets of Tulsa, Oklahoma, in 1921, witnessing – and narrowly avoiding – mass killings as white supremacists smash a neighborhood thriving regularly known as the “Black Route on the Side of the Wall. Since its premiere in October 2019, much has been written about how this five-minute series has done more to present widely to the public this suppressed second in history. than any college program (now few, if any, textbooks actually report Tulsa’s running bloodbath in real life).

Sepia-toned photographs and a synthesized ranking cinematize the cruelty to magnify the emotional effect of that violence within the Emmy-nominated film. Tulsa Burning: The bloodbath of the 1921 race. But, watching the Historical Past Channel’s two-part documentary (now available on Hulu), my focus also pounded by looking at archival footage from the ’90s of elderly survivors of a bloodbath recounting their flash memories of it. long-lasting trauma. “When I was 9, it used to be really boring because I was sleeping,” one older girl recounts on a grainy videotape. “My mother woke me up and advised me to get up. She said: ‘Eldoris, Eldoris! Get up so I can dress you. Other white people kill other colored people. Eldoris McCondichie’s now decades-old commentary, delivered with the poetic readability and cadence functionality of the latest technology, underscores the price to pay for taking note and truly soaking up precise, lived studies.

An explosive motion scene can do wonders to invigorate the previous one, as can the testimonies and oral histories of those who have actually moved throughout the horror. These twin non-fiction (Burning tulsa) and romanticized (Watchmen) Television shows paintings in conjunction now not better to resuscitate an old outdated episode but to distribute the advice to hundreds of thousands of other people. The legacy of what happened in Tulsa has already been silenced for almost a century due to hegemonic politics. Television – historically and disdainfully known as “the field of fools” and “the nipple tube” – has served to teach many audiences on occasions that have been close to historical books.

Tulsa Race Bloodbath match previously seen in HBO pilot episode Watchmen in 2019.
Mark Hill / HBO

At a time when many of our country’s leaders are trying to limit the social research programs taught in American colleges, which muzzle the narratives of oppressed and excluded peoples within black, local, Latin, Asian and LGBTQ + communities, feels much more essential that television and popular culture continue to include this type of peeled storytelling. As such, some of the highest TV techniques of 2020 and 2021 presented visionary tales of forgotten (or misinterpreted) affairs from the past.

Past honor Burning tulsa, which was previously nominated for his writing, song, and sound modification, the Emmys also identified various illuminating length techniques comparable to Lovecraft Country, The Underground Railroad, Bridgerton, The crown and Pose. Unlike the whole of the 60s The Queen’s Gambit, on the other hand, these collections do not simply capture a particular second culture or a lush period aesthetic. Instead, these presentations include a lesson: They hope to remove dusty layers of presumption and incorrect information to deliver other aspects of the story than the concept of the audience they knew or never had the risk of seizing in first position.

THEOvercraft Nation and Underground Railroad, for example, use wacky tropes to unearth under-explored chronicles of racial abuse in the supernatural drama on American television channel HBO Lovecraft Country To begin with, follows a group of black motorists who lobbied the United States in the 1950s. Confronted with lynching, Jim Crow settlements, sunset towns, and de facto segregation in the north, the collection literalizes these horrors by tightly incorporating the gore and the occult into the tale. Each Lovecraft Country and that of Amazon Underground Railroad providing a sickening fun zone replicating the mirror image of our nation’s backyard with eugenics, racist pseudoscience and systematic clinical abuse of other black people. In its highest episode, Amazon’s Magic Realist Restricted Collection hints at real-life racialized forced sterilization sagas when it brings previously enslaved fugitives Cora and Caesar (Thuso Mbedu and Aaron Pierre) into a seemingly secure village that is still missing from Black. small children and adolescents.

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HBO Lovecraft Country
Eli Joshua Ade / HBO

Bridgerton and The crown, each of Netflix, to begin with seem to be story sheets. The precedent is more often than not vigorous and gusty, presenting a cheerful, almost pre-industrial England with anomalous colors, where everyone dabbles in a somewhat romantic frippery. The latter is endlessly bitter and austere, describing the mid-twentieth century existence in Britain as an endless collection of serious national crises. However, each relates to slightly secret or outdated chapters within the British monarchy.

By explicitly choosing Golda Rosheuvel, a black actress, as the wife of George III, Queen Charlotte and writing her as a black royal who ushered in a whole new wave of racial fairness on this model of change of the England of the Regency era, the collection alludes to the reality of historians. -life assumption that Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz had African ancestors through her Portuguese lineage. (A chance that still proves to be relevant as Meghan Markle publicly navigates her position in the British royal circle of parents.) The crown, though more reserved in his social justice goals, reframe the sexism and ableism exercised against Princess Diana (who has struggled with psychological health issues and consumer dysfunction) throughout one of the most important moments of her marriage. Huge showrunner Peter Morgan makes you wonder if the very way of life of the monarchy is an inherent violation of human rights towards those who will have to undergo its tasks.

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by netflix The crown.
Netflix

Unlike royal history or some facets of black American history, LGBTQ + history is never taught in Okay-12 colleges – for example, I was in my twenties after discovering Harvey Milk or the Stonewall riots. This is why the FX Pose, which explores New York’s ballroom lore, early trans activism, and the AIDS epidemic throughout the ’80s and’ 90s, is great instructional software for the public. Since trans rights have transformed a national factor in large part over the past 15 years, it is easy for some cis and non-queer audiences to overlook that other trans and non-binary people existed long before our current second. . The collection mainly installs trans actors and characters in an environment where we do not see them all the time: the old. Even the competition of facts RuPaul’s Drag Race incorporates queer cultural history into its storytelling.

However, history is not just something that can be added and removed from the current day like a Velcro accent. It’s in progress, in real time. Emmy nominated documentary Welcome to Chechnya follows Chechen refugees using hidden cameras as they move away from Russia throughout the purges and persecutions of gay men that have been occurring in the region since the 2010s. The film, which particularly uses l ‘AI and complex visible results to protect the identity of its subjects, emphasizes that the historical past resides and breathes. As painful as it may be, every now and then we get to watch it on a digital camera.

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FX Pose.
Eric Liebowitz / FX

The story first caused a stir in an August independent article from The Hollywood Reporter magazine. To get the mag, click here to subscribe.


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Explore past musical compositions at the Redlands Library – Redlands Daily Facts

By Jill Martinson

AK Smiley Public Library was fortunate to recently add a large selection of music books representing various genres to our outstanding collection.

Jazz fans enjoyed “Straighten Up and Fly Right: the Life and Music of Nat King Cole” by Will Friedwald. Country music fans learned the background stories behind the songs in the autobiography “Dolly Parton, Songteller: My Life in Lyrics”, available in print and audio. Popular music listeners got a glimpse of Jeff Buckley’s thoughts and inspirations in “Jeff Buckley: His Own Voice: Journals, Objects and Ephemera”.

The following highlights music from a much older period, including Baroque, Classical and Romantic eras. This rich musical history dates from around 1600 to 1900, with familiar names like Vivaldi, Beethoven, and Liszt. Take a closer look at our classical music books and compact discs available at checkout.

Exceptionally detailed and entertaining, “Mozart: The Reign of Love” by Jan Swafford will tell you absolutely everything you want to know about the Austrian composer who was born in 1756 and died at the age of 35. Wolfgang was a musical prodigy before the royal courts from an early age. At age 7, his father Leopold presented his talents and those of his sister Nannerl, taking them across Europe for three years, covering thousands of kilometers and stopping in 88 cities. At 8, Mozart wrote his first symphony, at 11, his first opera. Swafford provides a comprehensive overview of Mozart’s musical influences, tours of Italy and time spent in Vienna. Her personal life, marriage, friendships and frustrations are fully explored. From the progression of his career to the keys in which he wrote his operas, even Mozart aficionados will learn something new and gain an appreciation for the man behind the music.

Interesting short entries, biographical backgrounds, and beautiful images include “Composers: Their Lives and Works” by DK Publishing. The featured composers begin in the 11th century with the Italian monk, Guido d’Arezzo, considered the inventor of modern musical notation. You will continue through history, examining key works and visiting different time periods before reaching the final entry with British composer Judith Weir, born in 1954. It is a wonderful book to read and a resource for those in the know. discover classical music.

Your education will not be complete without taking the time to listen to the expressive and beautiful pieces that classical music offers. Smiley Library’s outstanding CD collection is the perfect way to get acquainted with this passionate music and expand your sonic palette. Vivladi’s “Four Seasons”, Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 9” and Tchaikovsky’s “Swan Lake” are just a few of the pieces you can view on CD.

If you are lucky enough to see a live show, it is such a rewarding experience. The Redlands Bowl features some fantastic concerts in 2021, both virtual and live. In-person concerts include classical, taiko drum, Latin big band, music from India and Brazil. For more information and updates, visit www.redlandsbowl.org.

Founded in 1950, the Redlands Symphony has continuously provided exceptional and high quality performances to the community. Definitely take the time to hear them once they are back in the concert hall. For more information, visit www.redlandssymphony.com.

When you visit the Smiley Library in July, note the display case next to the main lending desk. It’s dedicated to classical music, and we’ll have some of our favorite books ready to take home with you.

Jill Martinson is Library Specialist at AK Smiley Public Library in Redlands.


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iQIYI launches its collection of romantic dramas “SWEET ON Theater”

Unlike typical romantic dramas, the “SWEET ON” series combines love with the workplace, fantasy, suspense and other innovative elements to produce more diverse stories and richer character pairs.

Breaking the trend of homogenization among sweet love dramas, the new themes will deliver a fresh and exciting experience to an aesthetically tired audience. The seven dramas feature over 20 promising young actors, such as BAI Lu, BI Wenjun, CHEN Haoyu, DING Yuxi, GE Xinyi, JU Jingyi, LIANG Jie, REN Jialun, REN Youlun, SHI Boyu, THE9’s YU Shuxin, WU Xuanyi, ZHANG Xincheng and ZHENG Yecheng. Heartwarming stories will inspire users’ desire for love and provide an outlet for their emotions.

The “SWEET ON” series offers users a rich array of romance-oriented content that allows each user to find an aspect of romance that they can resonate with. In new upcoming dramas, iQIYI captures the emotional needs and challenges young people face today. The decision to feature promising young actors was made specifically to bring the stories featured in the series closer to iQIYI’s target young audience.

At the recent iQIYI Global Conference in 2021, WANG Xiaohui, President of Professional Content Business Group (PCG) and Director of Content of iQIYI, noted that drama series have entered a new phase of development, with dramas short. duration exhibiting constant innovation in both style and genre. Globally, short-lived dramas are becoming more and more appealing to audiences, Wang said.

Following the Company’s highly successful “LIGHT ON Theater”, devoted to thriller and suspense series, and with upcoming launches of “SWEET ON” and the “LAUGHER ON” comedy collection, iQIYI’s short drama series will cover the full gamut of human emotion, spanning romance, suspense, comedy and more. Through these collections, iQIYI is stepping up its thematic operating model for short drama series, making it a major form in the streaming industry.

As a pioneer in the field, the company has received both critical and public acclaim for its innovative content collections. In the era of decentralized mass content distribution, iQIYI strives to meet the diverse needs of users through this new model, improving their user experience while attracting fans in niche segments. The “SWEET ON Theater” series will continue to build on the company’s curated collection model, delivering multi-faceted romantic storylines and diverse, high-quality content that users can relate to and be inspired by.

SOURCE iQIYI, Inc.

Related links

www.iqiyi.com


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iQIYI launches collection of romantic dramas “SWEET ON Theater”

Unlike typical romantic dramas, the “SWEET ON” series combines love with the workplace, fantasy, suspense and other innovative elements to produce more diverse stories and richer character pairs.

Breaking the trend of homogenization among sweet love dramas, the new themes will deliver a fresh and exciting experience to an aesthetically tired audience. The seven dramas feature over 20 promising young actors, such as BAI Lu, BI Wenjun, CHEN Haoyu, DING Yuxi, GE Xinyi, JU Jingyi, LIANG Jie, REN Jialun, REN Youlun, SHI Boyu, THE9’s YU Shuxin, WU Xuanyi, ZHANG Xincheng and ZHENG Yecheng. Heartwarming stories will inspire users’ desire for love and provide an outlet for their emotions.

The “SWEET ON” series offers users a rich array of romance-focused content that allows each user to find an aspect of romance that they can resonate with. In new upcoming dramas, iQIYI captures the emotional needs and challenges young people face today. The decision to feature promising young actors was made specifically to bring the stories featured in the series closer to iQIYI’s target young audience.

At the recent iQIYI Global Conference in 2021, WANG Xiaohui, President of Professional Content Business Group (PCG) and Director of Content of iQIYI, noted that drama series have entered a new phase of development, with dramas short. duration exhibiting constant innovation in both style and genre. Globally, short-lived dramas are becoming more and more appealing to audiences, Wang said.

Following the Company’s highly successful “LIGHT ON Theater”, devoted to thriller and suspense series, and with the upcoming launches of “SWEET ON” and the “LUGHER ON” comedy collection, iQIYI’s short drama series will cover the full gamut of human emotion, spanning romance, suspense, comedy and more. Through these collections, iQIYI is stepping up its thematic operating model for short drama series, making it a major form in the streaming industry.

As a pioneer in the field, the company has received both critical and public acclaim for its innovative content collections. In the era of decentralized mass content distribution, iQIYI strives to meet the diverse needs of users through this new model, improving their user experience while attracting fans in niche segments. The “SWEET ON Theater” series will continue to build on the company’s curated collection model, offering multi-faceted romantic storylines and diverse, high-quality content that users can identify with and be inspired by.

SOURCE iQIYI, Inc.

Related links

www.iqiyi.com


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Benjamin Sack’s impossible cityscapes draw inspiration from cartography and musical compositions

Art

#architecture #drawing #cards

November 3, 2019

Andrew LaSane

“Astrum”, 11 x 14 inches. All images are courtesy of the artist

At Direktorenhaus Museum in Berlin last week, a solo exhibition of detailed architectural drawings by a Virginia-based artist Benjamin Bag (previously) open to the public. Title Labyrinths, the collection of new works presents vast urban landscapes composed of impossible internal geometries. The city maps in the shape of a labyrinth refer to musical compositions and various symbols found in cosmology.

Often creating on the basis of what he calls a “fear of empty spaces,” Sack tells Colossal that his starting point for each drawing is different. Drawing inspiration from history, cartography and her own travels, the artist starts from a general concept and intuitively constructs her complex worlds as she goes. Star-shaped buildings and pathways meet rows of houses emerging from clusters of skyscrapers. The parts Labyrinths range from 11 inches by 14 inches (a standard photo print size) up to 90 inches wide and 69 inches high. A work entitled Babel Library is drawn on the surface of a globe measuring 16 inches in diameter. “Usually a large piece is started with a few really wide, simple pencil lines,” Sack explains. The rest of the lines and spaces are filled with a pen.

“Over the years my interest in architecture and cityscapes has evolved,” Sack told Colossal. He adds that drawing such complex pieces has “become a way to express infinity, to play with perspective and to explore a range of histories, cultures, places”.

Labyrinths will be exposed through January 22, 2020. For more imaginative Sack cards, follow the artist on Instagram.

“Library of Babel” (globe piece), 16 inches in diameter

Detail “Library of Babel”

Detail “Library of Babel”

Detail “Library of Babel”

Detail “Library of Babel”

“Canto IV” 70 x 70 inches

“Eden” 14 x 11 inches

“Peregrinations” 68 x 93 inches

“Samsara” 12 x 18 inches

“Stella Aurora” 11 x 14 inches

#architecture #drawing #cards

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Researchers unveil AI that translates proteins into musical compositions

Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) -activated system to translate protein structures into music and reconvert them to create new proteins never before seen in nature.

The method developed by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the United States provides a systematic way to translate the amino acid sequence of a protein into a musical sequence, using the physical properties of molecules to determine sounds .

Although the sounds are transposed in order to bring them within the range audible to humans, the tones and their relationships are based on the actual vibrational frequencies of each amino acid molecule itself, calculated using theories of quantum chemistry.

The system, described in the journal ACS Nano, translates the 20 types of amino acids, the building blocks that come together in chains to form all proteins, on a 20-tone scale.

The long amino acid sequence of any protein then becomes a sequence of notes.

Markus Buehler, professor at MIT, said that after listening to the resulting melodies, he is now able to differentiate certain sequences of amino acids that are in harmony with proteins with specific structural functions.

The whole concept is to better understand proteins and their wide range of variations, Buehler said.

Proteins are the structural material of skin, bones, and muscles, but are also enzymes, signaling chemicals, molecular switches, and a host of other functional materials that make up the machinery of all living things.

Their structures, however, including the way they bend into the shapes that often establish their functions, are extremely complicated.

“They have their own language, and we don’t know how it works. We don’t know what makes a silk protein a silk protein or what patterns reflect the functions found in an enzyme. We don’t know the code. “, he added. he said.

Buehler and his team hope to gain new insight into the relationships and differences between different families of proteins and their variations.

They also want to use this as a way to explore the many possible adjustments and modifications to their structure and function by translating this language into a different form that humans are very familiar with.

This allows different aspects of information to be encoded in different dimensions, height, volume and duration, the researchers said.

As with music, the structure of proteins is hierarchical, with different levels of structure at different time scales, they said.

To study the catalog of melodies by a wide variety of different proteins, an artificial intelligence system was used by the team.

The AI ​​system introduced slight changes in the musical sequence or created completely new sequences, and then translated the sounds into proteins that correspond to the modified or newly designed versions.

With this process, the team was able to create variations of existing proteins.

While the underlying rules may not be known to the researchers themselves, “AI has learned the language of protein design,” and it can code it to create variations of existing versions or designs. completely new protein, Buehler said.

Since there are “billions and billions” of potential combinations, he said, when it comes to creating new proteins, “you wouldn’t be able to do it from scratch, but that’s what AI can do. “

According to Buehler, training the AI ​​system with a dataset for a particular class of proteins can take a few days, but it can then produce a design for a new variant in microseconds.

“No other method comes close,” he said.

“The downside is that the model doesn’t tell us what’s really going on inside. We just know it’s working,” Buehler said.

“When you look at a molecule in a textbook, it’s static,” Buehler said.

The process does not allow for any controlled modification. Any change in properties such as mechanical strength, elasticity or chemical reactivity will be essentially random.

“You have yet to experience it,” he said.

When a new protein variant is produced, “there is no way to predict what it will do.”

Musical compositions developed from the sounds of amino acids were created by the team, which define this new musical scale of 20 tones.

The works of art they built are made entirely of sounds generated from amino acids.


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ASU Child Drama Collection Expands Reach to Academics

September 20, 2017

Archive of costume innovator Irene Corey – who created Barney looks to biblical characters – to feature a searchable list

Arizona State University’s Children’s Drama Collection is the world’s largest, most used and renowned youth theater repository, according to university officials.

It attracts academics, playwrights, performers, and students from around the world to study its costumes, screenplays, drawings, and ephemera – but the reach of one of its most prized parts has been limited to those who could. go to the Hayden Library in Tempe.

By the end of the year, however, a list of the contents of the Irene Corey collection will be available to everyone online. Then, Katherine Krzys thinks, “people will come in droves.”

“Irene Corey literally changed the face of costume and makeup design,” said Krzys, who among other roles – archivist, actress, director, author and historian – is the curator of the Child Drama Collection.

“All of these innovations are visually documented and printed in its archives for researchers and artists to discover. It is a unique source that will inspire generations of new theater artists.

Irene Corey and Barney, one of his most famous creations.

For more than half a century, Corey has designed costumes, sets and makeup for shows as diverse as theater classics and theme park characters. Corey became known nationally for the “Book of Job” in the 1950s, which spanned 22 years around the world.

She also designed the costumes for the TV show “Barney and Friends” (including the friendly dinosaur purple color) and helped create the first Chick-fil-A cows and the Bookworm from Half Price Books. Many in the field also believe that without Corey’s visionary work, audiences would not have seen “Cats” or “Lion King” on Broadway.

Items in the collection include Corey’s innovative costumes for “The Tempest” and “The Book of Job”, animal make-up renderings, production photographs, costume renderings, and his historical and cultural research records. .

“Irene was really in the process, and when you look at this collection you’re going to see little ideas on the backs of the menus, on the backs of the envelopes,” Krzys said. “Its process is the most important thing the collection can tell you.”

It may also tell you that Corey’s lifelong work is worth a pretty pennyCorey died of Parkinson’s disease in 2010. She was 84 years old.. Originally valued at $ 200,000 at the time of its donation in 1995, it is now possible that the collection is worth millions, said Lynda Xepoleas, an art history major at ASU. Art schoolThe School of Art is a unit within the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. and help in the ASU Library Conservation Lab.

“I’ve worked on a Marc Chagall costume show before, and he and Irene Corey were leading artists in their respective fields,” said Xepoleas, who works with Krzys to preserve the costume part of the collection. “The things I see in Irene’s collection are just as impressive as what I saw in her exhibit.”

Over the past few months, Xepoleas has created hanging and boxed storage for costumes, accessories, masks, wands, headdresses, belts and gloves. She said working with these items gave her insight into Corey’s creative process.

“She wanted these costumes and accessories to be seen from a distance rather than functional,” said Xepoleas. “Witnessing history up close has been very rewarding for me. “

Krzys said it took over a decade to convince Corey to donate his papers to ASU.

“I personally went to pack her papers in her art-filled home in Dallas – find costumes in the crawl space of her outdoor studio, renderings under the buffet in her dining room – everywhere she had it. space, ”Krzys said. “The process was filled with laughter, amazing stories, designer tips and a lifelong friendship.”

The Irene Corey Collection is part of the Child Drama Collection, the world’s largest compilation documenting the international history of children’s theater since the 16th century.

It was created at ASU in 1979 by librarian Marilyn Wurzburger, head of special collections, and Lin Wright, chair of the theater department at ASU. They jointly recommended the development of a children’s drama collection in response to the academic needs of students and teachers of youth theater at ASU and the research needs of professional artists and educators around the world.

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The first collection donated to the university, Wurzburger said, was from Rita Criste, a professor of children’s theater at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., Who donated her papers and books to the KNEW.

“All university libraries like to stand out because they know it will give them a certain prestige. They know people will come from all over the world to view a collection, ”said Wurzburger, who started at ASU in 1960 and retired in 2009.

Among those people was John Newman, a theater professor at the University of Utah Valley, who brought four theater students with him in July to view the collection. The students recently received a grant to research and develop a new play for the Utah Children’s Theater called “Builders of America,” based on several historical American figures.

“The students were so engaged in the research that it was difficult to take them away from the process,” Newman said. “We were greeted by the character Job, who wore an original Irene Corey costume, and it was a great introduction to the collection.”

Newman added that the collection captured the imagination of every one of his students – a designer, a playwright, a director and a playwrightA playwright is a professional writer / editor in a theater or opera company who is primarily engaged in the research and development of plays or operas..

“Kathy was able to find something that appealed to their individual or found a tangent that extended their interest,” Newman said. “It was an exceptional experience. “

Ashley Laverty, a graduate of the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts School of Film, Dance and Theater, MA in Fine Arts, Youth Theater Program, said she had spent a good deal of his academic career browsing the collection, drawing inspiration from his work.

“I used the collection fairly regularly during my three years in senior school at ASU, and it was a huge resource for me,” said Laverty, who now works for the Rose Theater, a premier venue for the performing arts in Omaha, Nebraska. “I’m lucky to have been on a program where I could literally ask Kathy for a play and she knows how to get it. “

Wurzburger said that once a university starts building a collection, others start to notice.

“People are starting to think, ‘I wish my papers were next to these,'” Wurzburger said. “When you get off to a good start, there is hope that you can build on that. “

Wurzburger was able to build on the collection thanks to a key recruit she made in 1985 by bringing in Krzys, who was then a graduate research assistant in the ASU MFA Theater for Youth program. Krzys said she had a job at a children’s theater in San Francisco after she graduated with her masters degree. She said she had to write an article on research methods and came across the collection of children’s dramas.


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